Glossary of Legislative Terms

General Legislative and Financial Terms

AMENDMENT
Changes in an introduced bill are made by amendment. An amendment may add to, substitute for or delete material.

ANTI-DONATION CLAUSE
Article 9, Section 14 of the constitution of New Mexico. The provision that prohibits the state from making direct grants of aid to entities or persons, despite the need or value of the project, unless the strict requirements of the provision are satisfied.

APPROPRIATION
The allocation of public money for a particular purpose by the act of the legislature, approved by the governor. Article 4, Section 30 of the constitution of New Mexico requires that appropriations distinctly specify the sum appropriated and the object to which it is to be applied. In addition, appropriation measures specify the fund from which the appropriation is made, the state agency to whom the appropriation goes, the fiscal years in which the appropriation can be expended or encumbered and whether the balance of the appropriation will revert to the funding source.

ATTORNEY GENERAL'S OPINION
Section 8-5-2 NMSA 1978 authorizes the attorney general to "give his opinion in writing upon any question of law submitted to him by the legislature or any branch thereof, any state official, elective or appointive, or any district attorney . . .". The attorney general's opinion is respected as that of the state's chief legal officer; however, the opinion does not have the force of law.

BILL
The form, used to propose laws, that has been introduced in the legislature and may originate in either house. Bills create, empower, impose duties or obligations, prohibit acts, appropriate money or do any combination of these things.

BILL DRAFT
Any piece of written legislation, at whatever stage of preparation, that has not yet been introduced as a bill.

BUDGET ADJUSTMENT REQUEST (BAR)
State agencies and higher education institutions may request changes to approved operating budgets under certain conditions. The proposed BAR must be approved by the state budget division of the department of finance and administration. The legislative finance committee has authority to review a BAR, but has no authority over approval of the BAR.

BUDGET CATEGORIES
The expenditure categories of a state agency budget, consisting of line items, by which the legislature appropriates money in the general appropriation act. The 10 state budget categories are: personal services; employee benefits; travel; maintenance and repairs; supplies and materials; contractual services; operating costs; other costs; capital outlay; and out-of-state travel.

BUDGET CYCLE
The four phases of the budget process, i.e., preparation, enactment, execution and audit.

CALENDAR
Daily calendars, printed for each house, list for each legislative day the numbers and titles of bills, memorials and resolutions to be considered under the several orders of business.

CALL OF THE CHAIR
A floor session is recessed subject to the "call of the chair" when it is necessary to hold another floor session at an undetermined time on the same day. Also, some committees do not have set meeting times and meet only at the call of the chair.

CALL OF THE HOUSE or SENATE
A legislative prerogative that requires all members of a legislative body to be present before the legislative action on which the "call" is put may proceed. The requirements for a "call" of each body are specified in the rules of that body.

CERTIFICATE OF CONDOLENCE or CONGRATULATIONS
Joint rules of the legislature prohibit the use of a bill, resolution or memorial for an official expression of condolence, congratulations or acknowledgment of achievement. The rules provide for the issuance of appropriate certificates for these occasions. Normally, a legislator should submit his request for a certificate to the chief clerk of the appropriate house.

COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE
When the house or senate meets as a full committee, with committee rules in effect, rather than in a plenary session with floor rules in effect.

COMMITTEE REPORT
The official report to the floor of the body that recommends a particular action to the body. A committee report documents the recommendation of a committee or conference committee on a particular bill.

COMPILATION or COMP
The New Mexico Statutes Annotated (the red statute books referred to as NMSA 1978 in statutory and other formal references) are the volumes in which the bills enacted into law are compiled under the direction and approval of the New Mexico compilation commission for publication and use by the public. The assigning of compilation numbers is authorized by law, but is not the law itself. The comp includes bracketed references and other notes of the compiler that are designed to assist the reader, but they are not the law. The comp is solely an annotated compilation of the law; the law is what is passed by the legislature, signed by the governor and printed as the session laws of a given year.

CONFERENCE COMMITTEE
Committees made up of members from each house who are appointed to work out a compromise on a bill that the two houses could not agree on. A conference committee is appointed by each house and each conference committee reports to its house by conference committee report. Both conference committee reports must be identical, and both must be passed by the body before the bill is passed.

CONFLICTS LIST
A reference document published by the legislative council service that shows how many bills include the same compilation sections and the action taken by each bill. The legislature can ameliorate conflicts by substituting several bills into one or by passing one bill and letting similar or conflicting bills die.

DAILY BILL LOCATOR
A reference document published by the legislative council service that tracks every piece of legislation introduced. It informs the reader of the date of introduction, committee referrals, dates of progress, whether the legislation has been amended, date of passage in each house and the vote, date of signature by the governor and chapter number.

DEFICIENCY APPROPRIATION
An appropriation to meet obligations incurred in a prior fiscal year.

DELAYED REPEAL
A section of a bill that provides for the future repeal of a section of law. Delayed repeal and sunset are often confused, but, in fact, are not synonymous actions. Repeal eliminates a provision of law; sunset eliminates an agency of government.

DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION (DFA)
The executive agency generally responsible for finance and management in state government. The department is comprised of the state budget, financial control, local government, management and contracts review and board of finance divisions.

DRAFTER or BILL DRAFTER
Refers to the professional staff members of the legislative council service who take requests from legislators and write the bill or other legislative proposal in compliance with the request. Some bill drafters are attorneys, but they are prohibited by legislative council rules from giving legal opinions.

E&E or ENROLLING AND ENGROSSING
The preparation of the final authoritative version of a bill passed by both houses of the legislature. The preparation is performed by the house of introduction and incorporates all amendments adopted and agreed to by both houses.

EFFECTIVE DATE
Article 4, Section 23 of the constitution of New Mexico provides that laws go into effect 90 days after the adjournment of the legislature enacting them, unless a later date is specified. A bill that does not contain an emergency clause cannot have an effective date earlier than 90 days after the end of the session.

EMERGENCY CLAUSE
A section inserted at the end of a bill that allows the bill to take effect immediately upon passage and approval by the governor. An emergency clause requires a two-thirds' vote in each house. A bill with an emergency clause that does not pass by the required vote goes into effect 90 days after adjournment.

EXECUTIVE BUDGET
A comprehensive set of appropriation recommendations to support state agencies, public schools and higher education for a fiscal year proposed by the governor and presented to the legislature for its consideration.

FEED BILL (HB 1)
The bill that funds the operations of the legislature for the legislative session and the continued operations of the legislature for the upcoming fiscal year. This includes the funds for legislative per diem and mileage and the salaries for session and full-time legislative staff. The bill is traditionally introduced as House Bill 1.

FISCAL IMPACT REPORT (FIR)
An analysis of a bill, prepared by the legislative finance committee staff, that estimates the effect the bill will have on the state's finances if passed. FIRs address direct and indirect costs as well as revenue changes resulting from the proposed legislation.

FISCAL YEAR (FY)
The state fiscal year begins on July 1 and ends on June 30 of the following calendar year. Fiscal years are known by the year in which they end, so the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1999 and ending June 30, 2000 is known as "Fiscal Year 2000".

FLOOR AMENDMENTS
Floor amendments are submitted after a bill has been placed on third reading and final passage and may only be proposed by the members of the house considering the bill. Each floor amendment is taken up and voted on in the order that it is submitted and, if adopted, becomes a consecutively numbered floor amendment to the bill under consideration.

FTE (FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT)
The method of quantifying the authorized work force for state agencies. For example, an FTE position may be filled by one full-time employee or two or more part-time or temporary employees.

GENERAL FUND
The fund to which certain state revenues are dedicated and from which is usually appropriated the ongoing support of state agencies, public schools and higher education.

HOUSE BILL 2 (HB 2)
The general appropriation act that funds the functions of government for the next fiscal year. By tradition, HB 2 is introduced by the chairman of the house appropriations and finance committee (HAFC) and then substituted in that committee.

INTERIM COMMITTEE
A committee of the legislature that meets when the legislature is not in session. An interim committee has no power to bind the legislature; it can only propose action to the legislature. An interim committee may not meet and has no power when the legislature is in session.

JACKETED BILL
A bill that is formally bound and ready for introduction to the legislature. House jackets are yellow; senate jackets are blue.

JOURNAL
The official records of all legislative action in the house and senate. Article 4, Section 12 of the constitution of New Mexico requires that each house keep a journal of its proceedings.

LEGISLATIVE DAY
A legislative day, as opposed to a calendar day, is kept separately by each house. It is a peculiar legislative mechanism that is needed to satisfy certain constitutional legislative requirements such as the reading of legislation on different days.

LEGISLATIVE FINANCE COMMITTEE (LFC) BUDGET
A comprehensive set of appropriation recommendations to support state agencies, public schools and higher education for a fiscal year proposed by the LFC and presented to the legislature for its consideration.

LINE ITEM VETO, PARTIAL VETO
The governor may veto parts of a bill containing an appropriation and then sign the remaining (unvetoed) portion of the bill into law.

MEMORIAL
A formal expression of legislative desire, usually addressed to another governmental body, in the form of a petition or declaration of intent. A memorial does not have the force of law. Memorials can be either joint or simple and require no action on the part of the governor. Joint memorials are acted on by both houses. Simple memorials are those of only one house and do not require the approval or acquiescence of the other house.

OPERATING BUDGET
The budget of a state agency, school district or higher education institution governing the expenditure of public money, usually for ongoing purposes. By law, operating budgets must have the prior approval of the state budget division of the department of finance and administration, commission on higher education or state department of public education.

OTHER STATE FUNDS
Revenues outside of the general fund that are dedicated to a particular agency or program of government. For example, revenues to the state road fund and expenditures of the state highway and transportation department from that fund are classified as "other state funds".

RESOLUTION
A formal declaration of the legislature concerning a certain subject it cannot or does not wish to control by law. Resolutions are either joint, concurrent or simple, and require no action on the part of the governor. The most common resolution is a joint resolution proposing an amendment to the constitution of New Mexico. Resolutions may also be used to propose or ratify amendments to the United States constitution and other specified purposes.

ROLL THE CLOCK
Refers to the changing of a legislative day. The clock may be rolled at any time during a floor session, although it is not required. Alternatively, the clock may be rolled more than once during a floor session.

SESSION LAWS
The full, complete and authentic version of every law enacted, including temporary and other noncompiled provisions, published in a volume entitled "Laws of New Mexico, 19__". The laws are printed in the numerical sequence in which they are received and assigned chapter numbers by the secretary of state. These volumes also contain the text of all proposed amendments to the constitution of New Mexico.

SEVERABILITY CLAUSE
The standard clause reads: "If any part or application of this act is held invalid, the remainder or its application to other situations or persons shall not be affected.". Ultimately, the court decides what is severable.

SINE DIE
A Latin term literally meaning "without day". It normally refers to the final adjournment of a particular session. The term means that the legislature adjourns without appointing a day on which to assemble again.

SPECIAL SESSION
A legislative session other than the regular session that starts on the third Tuesday of January each year. Special sessions may be called by the governor, or the legislature in certain circumstances, as provided in Article 4, Section 6 of the constitution of New Mexico.

SPONSOR
The legislator who introduces a bill. The prime sponsor is presumed to be the legislator who signs directly below the words "INTRODUCED BY" on the jacketed bill; all other signers are considered co-sponsors.

STANDING COMMITTEE
A committee of the house or senate when the legislature is in session. A standing committee proposes action to the body; it has no power to act for the body. A standing committee only exists when the legislature is in session, except the senate rules committee, which is authorized by the constitution to function in the interim.

SUBJECT INDEX
A reference document published weekly by the legislative council service that indexes introduced bills by subject matter.

SUBSTITUTE or SUB
Refers to a substitute bill. A substitute can be made for a bill whenever the bill is open to amendment. If adopted, the substitute takes the place of the original bill. A substitute is usually drafted for a bill that has been heavily amended and is, therefore, difficult to track. Sometimes a substitute is drafted to incorporate parts of several bills dealing with the same topic. There are no individual sponsors on a substitute bill.

SUNSET ACT
Provides procedures for legislative review, termination and renewal of agency life. It also provides a one-year period for the agency to wind up its affairs.

SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATION
An appropriation to augment the current year's operating budget.

VETO
The governor's rejection of a bill. The governor has 20 days after a session ends in which to act on any bill that is not presented to him for signature until the last three days of the session. He must act on bills presented to him earlier within three days. The governor's veto power is governed by Article 4, Section 22 of the constitution of New Mexico.

VETO OVERRIDE
Accomplished by a two-thirds' majority vote taken by both houses as provided in Article 4, Section 22 of the constitution of New Mexico.

VOTING RECORD
A compendium of the votes taken on the floor of each legislative body throughout a legislative session. Voting records are public records and are kept and maintained by the legislative council service.

Selected Education Definitions
SELECTED EDUCATION PROGRAM DEFINITIONS

ALTERNATIVE TESTING PROGRAMS
Testing that measures student performance without reliance on multiple choice and other traditional testing methods. Such alternatives (e.g., portfolios and demonstrations of mastery) also promote the development of problem solving and other higher level cognitive skills.

ANCILLARY SERVICES
Therapeutic or special assistance that an exceptional child assigned to a special education program may need in addition to placement in the special education program. Ancillary services must be provided directly by certified personnel and be part of the exceptional child's individualized educational program (IEP). Examples include such services as speech, language, physical or occupational therapy; orientation and mobility services; interpreter and educational audiology services for the hearing impaired; and psychological services. (Also referred to as related services.)

BILINGUAL MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION
Programs subject to State Board of Education (SBE) approval prior to state funding that are implemented by districts to enable students to learn through two languages to understand and participate in the cultures of their environment.

CHARTER SCHOOLS ACT
A law that allows the SBE to authorize an individual school within a school district to develop and implement an alternative educational curriculum and to develop and utilize a school-based budget.

COMPREHENSIVE SCHOOL REFORM DEMONSTRATION (CSRD)
A federal competitive grant program that provides financial incentives for schools that need to substantially improve student achievement, particularly Title I schools, to implement comprehensive school reform programs that are based on reliable research and effective practices. During the 1998-99 school year, New Mexico received $1.2 million.

COMPULSORY SCHOOL ATTENDANCE LAW
A requirement that any qualified student and any person who, because of his or her age is eligible to become a qualified student, must attend a public school, a private school, a home school or a state institution until attaining the age of majority. A qualified student is defined as a public school student who: (1) has not graduated from high school; (2) is regularly enrolled in one-half or more of the minimum course requirements approved by SBE for public school students; and (3) is at least five years of age prior to 12:01 a.m. on September 1 of the school year.

COMPUTERS IN THE SCHOOLS PROGRAM
A program administered by the educational technology bureau at the state department of public education (SDE) to help school districts subsidize the cost of computers. In the 1998 special session, the legislature appropriated $1 million to provide a state match for the computers in the schools program. Computers will be subsidized at a rate of $450 each until the fund is exhausted. School districts have two options from which to choose. Option I is a 200MMX Pentium computer, which costs $650; Option II is a 266 Pentium II computer, which costs $725. The costs to school districts for these options are $200 and $275 respectively. In addition to administering the appropriation, SDE will evaluate applications from school districts for computer assistance.

DROPOUT
A person who has not graduated from high school, who leaves school or is disenrolled for any reason except transfer to another school or death.

EDUCATIONAL RETIREMENT ACT (ERA)
A law that spells out details of membership in and administration of New Mexico's educational retirement program.

E-RATE
A federal program, pursuant to the Telecommunications Act of 1996, which provides public schools and libraries discounts on telecommunications services (regular phone charges) and infrastructure (anything behind a computer, which provides a connection to the internet). These discounts range from 20 percent to 90 percent based on the poverty rate as defined in Title I (percentage of students eligible for free and reduced lunches). The only requirements are that schools must have a technology plan that is approved by the SDE and that they submit the application form to the federal agency administering the E-Rate program, which is the schools and libraries corporation (SLC).

FAMILY IN NEED OF SERVICES ACT (FINS)
A referral process to identify and provide early intervention services to children and their families considered at risk because of collapse of the family unit.

GOALS 2000
A federal initiative signed into law on March 31, 1994 (Goals 2000: Educate America Act), which provides resources to states and communities to develop and implement comprehensive education reforms aimed at helping students reach the following challenging academic and occupational skill standards:

1. By the year 2000, all children in America will start school ready to learn.

2. By the year 2000, the high school graduation rate will increase to at least 90 percent.

3. By the year 2000, all students will leave grades 4, 8 and 12 having demonstrated competency over challenging subject matter, including English, mathematics, science, foreign languages, civics and government, economics, arts, history and geography; and every school in America will ensure that all students learn to use their minds well, so that they may be prepared for responsible citizenship, further learning and productive employment in our nation's modern economy.

4. By the year 2000, the nation's teaching force will have access to programs for the continued improvement of their professional skills and the opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skills needed to instruct and prepare all American students for the next century.

5. By the year 2000, United States students will be first in the world in mathematics and science achievement.

6. By the year 2000, every adult American will be literate and will possess the knowledge and skills necessary to compete in a global economy and exercise the rights and responsibilities of citizenship.

7. By the year 2000, every school in the United States will be free of drugs, violence and the unauthorized presence of firearms and alcohol and will offer a disciplined environment conducive to learning.

8. By the year 2000, every school will promote partnerships that will increase parental involvement and participation in promoting the social, emotional and academic growth of children.

Two Additional New Mexico Goals:

1. New Mexico students will leave grade 12 with an understanding of the arts and demonstrated competency in at least one form of artistic expression.

2. New Mexico students will leave grade 12 with an understanding of the cultural heritage of the state and competency in English and at least one other language.

HOME SCHOOL
A home study program authorized by law that provides a basic academic educational program operated by a parent, guardian or other person having custody of a school-aged person.

INCLUSION
A policy pertaining to special education students requiring that students with disabilities be educated and participate in all aspects of school life with their nondisabled peers in the least restrictive educational environment to the maximum extent appropriate.

INDIVIDUALIZED EDUCATION PROGRAM (IEP)
An individualized plan required by federal law for all students in special education that contains yearly goals as determined by the parent or guardian, the teacher and other members of the student's IEP team.

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIAL
School textbooks and supplementary instructional material adopted by the SBE pursuant to the Instructional Material Law. School districts, state institutions and adult basic education centers must select at least 70 percent of instructional material for the use of their students from the official state list of approved material. Private schools receiving instructional material allocations from the state must select 100 percent of material purchased with those funds from the official list.

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIAL TEXTBOOK DEPOSITORIES
Distribution points in New Mexico functioning to distribute to schools instructional material received on consignment from publishers.

LOCAL SCHOOL BOARD
A statutorily created local board of education made up of either five or seven members elected at large or by geographic district (in larger school districts) in each of the state's 89 school districts. The local board supervises and controls all public schools in its district.

OUTCOMES-BASED EDUCATION (OBE)
An educational philosophy based on the concept that educators and their respective communities determine what students should learn to achieve a high level of performance by the time they graduate ("outcomes"), find ways to measure those outcomes and allow teachers time and resources to help students achieve the outcomes.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Activities designed to improve educators' performance and the achievement of their students (e.g., formal course work, in service programs, professional conferences and peer coaching).

PUBLIC SCHOOL CODE
New Mexico statutes governing the state's public schools.

PUBLIC SCHOOL INSURANCE AUTHORITY ACT (PSIA)
A law that provides comprehensive core insurance programs for all eligible public and post-secondary schools, school board members and school employees, as well as their eligible dependents.

PUBLIC SCHOOL TRANSPORTATION
Transportation to and from public schools that is guaranteed by statute for all New Mexico students who live beyond a minimum distance from school. Transportation costs are fully funded by the state and transportation may either be provided by local school districts or private contractors.

REGIONAL COOPERATIVE CENTERS (RCCs)
Seven local education cooperatives made up of school districts. RCCs coordinate and provide federally funded special education and other services to member districts. One of the member districts acts as a fiscal agent.

REGIONAL EDUCATIONAL COOPERATIVE (RECs)
Three local education cooperatives made up of school districts. Like RCCs, they coordinate and provide federally funded special education and other services to member districts. Unlike RCCs, they act as their own fiscal agents.

RELEARNING
Educational philosophy based on nine common principles of learning designed to influence the restructuring of all levels of the educational system from the schoolhouse to the statehouse to help students learn to use their minds well.

RESTRUCTURING
A long-term commitment to bring about fundamental, systemic change in education based on the premise that all students can and must develop higher level thinking skills.

RETIREE HEALTH CARE ACT (RHCA)
An act that provides comprehensive health insurance for retirees and the spouses and dependents of those retiring from certain public service positions in New Mexico.

SCHOOL-TO-WORK TRANSITION
A process related to the federal School-to-Work Opportunities Act. The act authorizes grants to states and communities to help young people make the transition from education to employment. The act requires eligible school-to-work programs to include school-based learning, work-based learning and connecting activities. The act includes a repeal clause of 2001.

SCHOOL YEAR
One hundred eighty days of instruction, or the equivalent as established in law and offered by public schools in a school district during a period of 12 consecutive months.

SITE-BASED MANAGEMENT
A philosophy of management in which decisions regarding curriculum and resource allocation are made at the school site by those who are closest to the source of education: the principal, teachers, parents, community groups and students.

SPECIAL EDUCATION
State-funded programs approved by SBE providing services in addition to those provided in the regular school program to meet the needs of exceptional children as outlined in their IEPs.

SPECIAL PROJECTS
Educational programs designed to improve student achievement or provide professional development activities. Special projects are sometimes funded categorically by the legislature outside the public school funding formula.

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION (SBE)
A constitutionally created, 15 member governing authority for the state's public schools and vocational education programs.

STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC EDUCATION (SDE)
A constitutionally created agency subject to the policies of SBE and direction of the state superintendent of public instruction that supervises schools and school officials under the authority of SBE.

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
A constitutional officer appointed by and subject to policies established by SBE.

SYSTEMIC CHANGE
A reform movement focusing on the establishment of high expectations of all students, flexibility in meeting the needs of students, a system of accountability to ensure student achievement and growth, and a more coherent policy system to support and sustain school-based change.

TECHNOLOGY FOR EDUCATION ACT
A law enacted in 1994 to establish a planning and funding strategy that will support the development and maintenance of an effective technology infrastructure for all learners in New Mexico.

TECHNOLOGY LITERACY CHALLENGE FUND (TLCF)
A federal initiative that began in February 1996, under Title III of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). Funding is provided to advance the president's four goals for technology in education through state-administered grants to public school districts.

TEMPORARY ASSISTANCE FOR NEEDY FAMILIES (TANF)
A federal block grant program that provides for qualified state expenditures to include cash assistance, childcare assistance and educational activities designed to increase self-sufficiency, enhance job training and prepare recipients for work pursuant to the New Mexico Works Act. TANF-eligible participants must be at or below 100 percent of the federal poverty level and have a dependent child 18 years of age or younger.

VARIABLE SCHOOL CALENDAR ACT (VSCA)
A law governing school or school district operations extending beyond the traditional nine-month period in any one calendar year that permits pupil attendance on a staggered schedule and provides authority and procedures for approving multi-track year-round education programs.

SELECTED PUBLIC SCHOOL FINANCE DEFINITIONS

BASIC PROGRAM UNITS
Number of basic program units determined by multiplying basic program membership in each grade by the corresponding cost differential factor as follows:

Membership Cost Differential

Kindergarten FTE: 1.440

Grade 1: 1.200

Grades 2-3: 1.180

Grades 4-6: 1.045

Grades 7-12: 1.250

BILINGUAL MULTICULTURAL PROGRAM UNITS
Number of full-time equivalent students in approved bilingual programs times the current cost differential factor of 0.425.

COST DIFFERENTIAL
Numerical expression of the relative costs of educational programs.

DECEMBER 1
The student membership count date used to determine the number of program units for special education programs.

EMERGENCY CAPITAL OUTLAY
Emergency distributions to school districts that have experienced an unexpected capital outlay emergency demanding immediate attention.

ENROLLMENT GROWTH UNITS
A factor in the public school funding formula used to compensate a school district experiencing an increase in membership equal to or greater than one percent when compared with the preceding year. A district meeting that description is eligible for additional program units equal to 0.5 times the membership increase.

FEDERAL REVENUE
School district receipts from forest reserve funds and Impact Aid funds except for those Impact Aid funds for special education and for students living on Indian lands.

FORTIETH DAY
The student membership count day used to determine the number of program units for all programs except special education.

LOCAL REVENUE
Receipts to school districts from the school district property tax (.5 mill).

MEMBERSHIP (MEM)
Sum of qualified students: (1) in grades 1-12; (2) students in C and D class special education; (3) three- and four-year-old developmentally disabled children; and (4) 0.5 times the actual number of children in early childhood education (kindergarten) programs.

OUT-OF-STATE TUITION
Payments for students who are attending school out of state because school facilities are not reasonably available in their local school districts.

PROGRAM COST
Product of the total number of program units multiplied by the dollar value per program.

PUBLIC SCHOOL FUNDING FORMULA
A formula that specifies the procedures for determining each district's total program units, program cost dollars and the amount of money to be distributed to the district. The formula uses cost differentials to reflect higher costs incurred in providing certain educational programs and includes factors for early childhood education, basic grades 1-12 programs, special education and bilingual education programs, students at risk, size adjustments, enrollment growth and a factor for training and experience.

QUALIFIED STUDENT
A public school student who meets the following statutory criteria: (1) has not graduated from high school; (2) is regularly enrolled in one half or more of the minimum course requirements approved by SBE; (3) is at least 5 years of age prior to 12:01 a.m. on September 1 of the school year; (4) is at least 3 years of age at any time during the school year and receiving special education services pursuant to SBE regulations; or (5) has not reached his/her 22nd birthday on the first day of the school year and is receiving special education services pursuant to SBE regulations.

REVENUE CREDITS
ninety-five percent of local (.5 mill levy) and federal revenues (forest reserve and impact aid).

SIZE ADJUSTMENT UNITS
Additional program units based on size according to the following categories:

• Elementary/junior high schools with membership's of less than 400

• Senior high schools with membership's of less than 400

• Districts with a total membership of less than 4,000

• Districts with over 10,000 member with a ratio of membership to senior high schools less than 4,000:1

SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAM UNITS

Sum of special education program units determined by multiplying the number of approved programs or students by the corresponding cost differential factor as follows:

Program/Membership

Cost Differential

Ancillary FTE Personnel including diagnosticians: 25.000

Approved A/B class programs: .700

Students in class C programs: 1.000

Students in class D programs: 2.000

3- and 4-year-old developmentally disabled students: 2.000

STATE EQUALIZATION GUARANTEE
State distribution of funds to districts, which equals the program cost minus revenue credits.

STATE SUPPORT RESERVE FUND
Nonreverting funds used to ensure that the state equalization guarantee distribution is not reduced because of an unexpected decrease in credits or an unanticipated increase in program units.

SUPPLEMENTARY EMERGENCY
Emergency distributions to districts in financial need. However, no distributions shall be made to any district having cash and invested reserves, or other resources or any combinations thereof, equaling five percent or more of the school district's operational budget.

TOTAL PROGRAM UNITS
Sum of early childhood, basic, special education and bilingual education units times the training and experience index plus size adjustment, at risk, enrollment growth and save harmless units.

TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE INDEX
A factor, in the range from 1.00 to 1.50, that is multiplied by the total number of program units to compensate districts for higher levels of instructional staff experience and training.

UNIT VALUE
Amount of money provided for each program unit (program cost divided by total statewide units) as determined by the state superintendent of public instruction or the legislature.