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F I S C A L I M P A C T R E P O R T
SPONSOR Picraux
ORIGINAL DATE
LAST UPDATED
2/6/06
HB 491
SHORT TITLE UNM Family Development Program
SB
ANALYST Lewis
APPROPRIATION (dollars in thousands)
Appropriation
Recurring
or Non-Rec
Fund
Affected
FY06
FY07
555.0
Recurring
General Fund
(Parenthesis ( ) Indicate Expenditure Decreases)
Duplicates SB 79.
Relates to HB 726 (Expand
UNM Family Development Program
)
Relates to SB 646 (
UNM Family Development Program
)
SOURCES OF INFORMATION
LFC Files
Responses Received From
Higher Education Department (HED)
Public Education Department (PED)
Children, Youth and Families Department (CYFD)
SUMMARY
Synopsis of Bill
House Bill 491 appropriates $555,000 from the general fund to the Board of Regents of the Uni-
versity of New Mexico for the Family Development Programís Statewide Training Outreach
Program and the Family Development Programís Comprehensive Training Program based on
brain development research in the science of early learning.
FISCAL IMPLICATIONS
The appropriation of $555,000 contained in this bill is a recurring expense to the general fund.
Any unexpended or unencumbered balance remaining at the end of fiscal year 2007 shall revert
to the general fund.
pg_0002
House Bill 491 Ė Page
2
As of 2/6/06, Senate Bill 415 includes $400,000 to expand services for the Family Development
Program, including personal services and employee benefits of additional full-time-equivalent
positions;
SIGNIFICANT ISSUES
According to the University of New Mexico (UNM), the Family Development Program (FDP)
within the UNM College of Education, provides research-based professional development work-
shops throughout New Mexico, and disseminates educational materials relevant to childrenís
early education and development. The workshops and materials reflect current research on the
critical importance of childrenís development in the first years of life and on how children learn
best. They are based on research in family-centered, multicultural, bilingual education and match
national recommendations for best practices for training teachers to help teachers and family
members respond to young childrenís earliest delight in learning.
UNM notes that in 2004-2005, FDP brought together 1,385 teachers, staff, parents and other
family members from 98 communities throughout New Mexico to participate in 116 professional
and skills development workshops. FDPís Family Development Journal is distributed semiannu-
ally to school superintendents, directors of instruction, elementary school principals, early child-
hood educators, parents, and pediatricians, various community-based programs, and, through a
partnership with the Children, Youth and Families Department (CYFD), to 8,000 registered child
care providers.
According to the Higher Education Department (HED),
the Family Development Program is one
of the top initiatives identified by the UNM Board of Regents for this year. This billís appropria-
tion would help provide statewide training outreach and expand FDPís current comprehensive
training program based on brain development research in the science of early learning. Of the
$555,000 appropriated:
$250,000 would augment the base budget to meet increasing demand for statewide early
childhood professional development; and
$305,000 would help develop statewide training capacity so that the program ďMind in the
Making: The Science of Early LearningĒ could be offered to both rural and urban communi-
ties who have requested this training.
HED notes that New Mexico is the first state in the nation to implement a program of this type,
which utilizes the latest brain research information about how children learn. With past state
support and other grant money, this internationally recognized program provides statewide train-
ing to members of the public as well as state entities. It serves the community directly by pro-
moting opportunities for families and individuals to recognize their strengths, set their own
agendas, and make creative changes in their lives.
HED adds that the need for professional development in a rural state like New Mexico is tre-
mendous. In 2004-2005, only 67% of the proposed community partnerships could be served due
to staffing limitations. Additional funding would provide service to 50 more communities im-
pacting 25,000 children.
The proposal was submitted to the Higher Education Department by UNM and included in
pg_0003
House Bill 491 Ė Page
3
HEDís funding recommendation for FY07 in the total amount of $663,100 (including $413,100
base appropriation, plus $250,000 for expansion).
PERFORMANCE IMPLICATIONS
According to HED,
this appropriation would support the state goals of closing the achievement
gap and assuring educational success for all children. Mind in the Making: New Mexico expects
to serve at least 200 early childhood educators each year impacting more than 4,000 young chil-
dren.
ML/nt