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F I S C A L I M P A C T R E P O R T
SPONSOR Martinez
ORIGINAL DATE
LAST UPDATED
2-4-06
HB
SHORT TITLE
CHIMAYO YOUTH CORPS DRUG ABUSE
PREVENTION
SB 519
ANALYST Lucero
APPROPRIATION (dollars in thousands)
Appropriation
Recurring
or Non-Rec
Fund
Affected
FY06
FY07
$200.0
Recurring
General Fund
(Parenthesis ( ) Indicate Expenditure Decreases)
Duplicates HB832, Relates to HB236
Relates to Appropriation in the General Appropriation Act
SOURCES OF INFORMATION
LFC Files
Responses Received From
Children, Youth and Families Department (CYFD)
Department of Health (DOH)
Public Education Department (PED)
SUMMARY
Synopsis of Bill
Senate Bill 519 appropriates $200.0 from the general fund to Children, Youth and Families De-
partment for the purpose of expanding the Chimayo youth conservation corps to provide drug
abuse prevention and harm reduction program services to youth twelve to twenty-one years of
age in the Chimayo area of Rio Arriba and Santa Fe counties.
FISCAL IMPLICATIONS
The appropriation of $200.0 contained in this bill is a recurring expense to the general fund. Any
unexpended or unencumbered balance remaining at the end of fiscal year 2007 shall revert to the
general fund.
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Senate Bill 519 Page
2
SIGNIFICANT ISSUES
CYFD currently has a contract of $70,000 with this program through Value Options.
Espanola Valley has long been an epicenter of heroin abuse. Two counties in northern New Mex-
ico, Rio Arriba County and Santa Fe County, rank number one and two in the nation for heroin
overdoses per capita. (New Mexico Regional Partnership Southwest Border HIDTA) Despite
several crackdowns by law enforcement, the region continues to have the nation's highest per
capita overdose death rate and according to the 2004 New Mexico social Indicator Report, Rio
Arriba County rates highest in the state for alcohol and drug related deaths. The drug related
death rate in Rio Arriba County is almost seven times the National rate.
Overdose drug deaths were greater than 50 per 100,000 in the Chimayo area of Rio Arriba/Santa
Fe Counties between 1998 2002 (Office of the Medical Investigator, Epidemiology and Re-
sponse Division).
For the last four years DOH has funded the Chimayo Youth Conservation Corps as a sub-
contractor of New Mexico Voices for Children to provide prevention services in Chimayo. The
group works with the Chimayo Crime Prevention Coalition to address problems in the area.
Two counties in northern New Mexico, Rio Arriba County and Santa Fe County, rank number
one and two in the nation for heroin overdoses per capita. (New Mexico Regional Partnership
Southwest Border HIDTA)
Gangs facilitate much of the drug distribution that occurs at the street level and are responsible
for much of the drug-related violence in the region. (New Mexico Regional Partnership South-
west Border HIDTA)
Recent trends in youth drug use have shown the first significant downturn in usage levels but
they remain at high levels. It has been shown that the earlier drug use is initiated the more likely
a person is to develop drug problems later in life. (New Mexico Regional Partnership Southwest
Border HIDTA)
Youth substance abuse can lead to many other problems, including the development of delin-
quent behavior, anti-social attitudes and health-related issues. These problems not only affect the
child but can also influence the child's family, community and ultimately society. (New Mexico
Regional Partnership Southwest Border HIDTA)
ADMINISTRATIVE IMPLICATIONS
CYFD will absorb any additional administrative impact associated with passage of this bill.
CONFLICT, DUPLICATION, COMPANIONSHIP, RELATIONSHIP
Duplicates HB832
Relates to HB236 appropriating money for Santa Fe County drug prevention.
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3
TECHNICAL ISSUES
As this appropriation is specific to Behavioral Health Services, it is likely that the resources
would be appropriated and managed through the Behavioral Health Collaborative process.
OTHER SUBSTANTIVE ISSUES
The Department of Health commented that the Behavioral Health Purchasing Collaborative is
charged with overseeing all publicly funded behavioral health services. In general, intensive out-
patient programs are more cost effective and more effective than inpatient services because the
client is able to remain in the community, remain employed and have the necessary support sys-
tems available.
WHAT WILL BE THE CONSEQUENCES OF NOT ENACTING THIS BILL
Funding may not be available to the Chimayo Youth Conservations Corps for expansion of their
drug abuse and harm reduction program services in the Chimayo area in Rio Arriba and Santa Fe
counties.
DL/nt
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Nation
Lessons from New Mexico's War on Heroin
by John Burnett
All Things Considered
, August 18, 2005 The successes and limits of the nation's drug war are
being played out in northern New Mexico, where the Espanola Valley has long been an epicenter
of heroin abuse. Despite a crackdown by law enforcement, the region continues to have the na-
tion's highest per capita overdose death rate.
Until recently, the historic town of Chimayo, N.M., a half-hour north of Santa Fe, was famous
for an epidemic of Mexican black-tar heroin use. Stoned young people died in highway acci-
dents. Junkies murdered victims for drug money. People were afraid to leave their houses, fear-
ing a break-in.
In September 1999, a massive assault force of federal, state and local police swooped down on
Chimayo, hauling off members of families who had for years been suspected of selling heroin.
Since the raid, locals say the daily violence, overdoses and burglaries are far fewer. Residents
have started several civic and youth groups to help keep young people out of trouble.
Life in Chimayo has improved markedly, but the drug traffic has moved to surrounding commu-
nities in the Espanola Valley, bringing with it the same overdoses and property crimes. Six
months ago, federal authorities staged a second big raid in the valley. This time, they arrested
scores of Mexican nationals who had picked up the drug business left by the jailed Chimayo
pushers.
Dr. Fernando Bayardo, a local anti-drug activist, notes that heroin abuse has been entrenched in
the valley for more than 50 years. In many instances, whole families share the dependence, add-
ing another obstacle to efforts to stamp out abuse.
"You have a grandmother shooting up with a grandchild," Bayardo says. "You have family
members shooting up together. It's not something the teenage son hides from other family mem-
bers. How are you going to change those unhealthy lifestyles and habits and develop new
norms."
This story was produced by Marisa Penaloza and edited by Andrea de Leon.
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Senate Bill 519 Page
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Marisa Penaloza, NPR
New Mexico's Espanola Valley is characterized by historic buildings such as the Santuario de
Chimayo, which dates back to the early 1800s -- and by an entrenched heroin-abuse problem.
Melody Kokoszka, NPR
Spaniards first settled the Espanola Valley along the Rio Grande more than 400 years ago.
Though Chimayo's drug-related problems have improved since 1999, the heroin traffic has
moved to surrounding communities in the Espanola Valley.
An Addict's Tale of Redemption
Courtesy Wilfredo Azul
Wilfredo Azul La Luz Baez Otero Figueroa Rosario is a postdoctoral student at the University of
New Mexico. Listen to him tell the story of how he turned his life around -- from heroin addict to
county administrator and academic. Last year, he conducted a study on behalf of the New Mex-
ico Department of Health that looked at substance use patterns in the Espanola Valley of New
Mexico.
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Senate Bill 519 Page
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Marisa Penaloza, NPR
A lieutenant with the criminal investigations unit at the Espanola Police Department holds heroin
seized from dealers. Dealers use color-coded balloons to denote different amounts of heroin.